Dog Emergency Care


This collection of Dog Emergency Care articles has been curated for you by Riverbark Veterinary Hospital. If you would like to talk to a veterinarian, please give us a call at (910) 621-1604.

Exploring Bloat in Dogs

Bloat in dogs is an extremely serious and dangerous medical condition that should be treated as a medical emergency. Even mild cases of bloat can turn fatal. Although the causes of bloat are still not clear, the symptoms that occur are fairly consistent and are a sign that you should seek immediate medical attention.


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Summer Heat and Your Dog

Temperature elevation in your dog can happen for more than one reason - they could have a fever (which often means infection), or it could be elevated from environmental factors such as heat and humidity. A dog’s normal temperature ranges from 99 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit, and temperatures in the 103-105 range could mean heat exhaustion.


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Severe Weather Prep and Planning for Pets

Floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfires. There’s no part of the country that hasn’t been affected by weather emergencies in recent years.

This is why it’s a good idea to have an emergency plan for your entire family, including your pets. Hopefully, you’ll never need it. But since summer is prime time for severe storms and flooding, why not take a few minutes to review your plan and if needed, create a “go” bag in case of emergency?


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"Bee" Careful: Stings Can Be Serious!

April showers bring May flowers…and with them, bees.

Just like humans, pets can have severe or even life-threatening reactions to bee stings. Unfortunately, our furry friends are also at greater risk for stings due to their curious and playful nature.

Because pets often like to chase, swat, or bite at bees and other flying insects, they are most likely to be stung in the mouth or on the muzzle, nose, face, or paws. It is also common for dogs to accidentally step on a bee while out on a walk.


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How Hot is Too Hot? Heat Stress in Pets

Summer’s almost here! It’s time to sweat (or hide in the air conditioning). But your dog can’t sweat, and your cat only sweats between his toes. So how do you tell if your pet is starting to get overheated? It’s not quite the same with them as it is for us, but there are signs that, once you know them, will seem obvious. 


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Can Your Pet Get the Flu? What You Need to Know About CIV

The recent outbreak of canine influenza virus (CIV) in the Midwestern region of the United States has affected more than 1,000 dogs. Should you be worried?

As with all infectious and parasitic disease trends, our doctors have been closely following this issue and its possible indications for our clients and patients.


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